Reporter Yamiche Alcindor Race-Baits Surgeon General Jerome Adams After Heartfelt Statement About Coronavirus to Black and Latino Communities


PBS NewsHour reporter Yamich Alcindor asked a racially charged question of Surgeon General Jerome Adams, MD, at Friday’s White House coronavirus task force briefing, accusing Adams of insulting the black and Latino communities by asking them to avoid drugs and alcohol and by using terms of endearment like, “big mama” in his remarks at the briefing. Adams also included Native Americans in his remarks. Adams and Alcindor are both black.

Adams had made a heartfelt statement to the African-American and Latino communities, stating that they are not genetically prone to the COVID-19 Chinese coronavirus. Adams spoke to the economic conditions and habits that plague the black community, calling for changes and urging the young in the black and brown community to protect their elderly relatives, using colloquial terms of endearment.

Toward the end, Adams spoke about his own reliance on life-saving asthma inhalers that he has carried for forty years as an example to young people with asthma that they can succeed in life despite their affliction.

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That was too much for Alcindor.

“Thank you Mr. Attorney, Surgeon General, I have a quick question for you. You said that African-Americans and Latinos should avoid alcohol, drugs and tobacco. You also said, ‘do it for your abuela, do it for big mama, and pop-pop. There are some people (Adams: “I said granddaddy, too”) online that are already offended by that language and the idea that you are saying behaviors might, um, be leading to these high death rates. Can you talk about whether or not people should, or, I guess do you have a response to people who might be offended by the language that you used?”

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As noted by the Trump campaign while Adams made his initial comments, Alcindor live tweeted her concern troll commentary, indicating that she was the one offended and telegraphing her race-baiting question.

“US Surgeon General Jerome Adams says black, Latino & other people of color should “avoid alcohol, tobacco and drugs.” “We need you to step up,” he says. Some will find this language offensive after Adams stressed that behavior was not the issue for why more black ppl are dying.”

“Jerome Adams, U.S. Surgeon General, tells black people, Latinos and other ppl of color to avoid alcohol and drugs and adds: “Do it for your abuela, do it for your grandaddy, do it for your Big Mama, do it for your pop pop.”
Context: Many found this language highly offensive.”





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